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Aug 13, 2016

Goodbye Party For Miss Pushpa T.S.

Goodbye Party For Miss Pushpa T.S. by Nissim Ezekiel
By
Bijay Kant Dubey

A lover of Pushpa here speaks in as the protagonist of the poem and he is none the else but the poet Nissim Ezekiel himself unable to contain in the feelings of his heart, expressing the unputdownable on paper. Let us see how he is receiving or taking her to the airport as for going to foreign and Pushpa a distant acquaintance of his relative taking tips from a London returnee. As an announcer the poet starts the poem, friends, ladies and gentlemen, our dear sister Pushpa is going to foreign in two to three days, wish her Godspeed, have a nice journey.

Addressing the friends, the poet says it we all know it how sweet is Miss Pushpa, what sweetness is it her, we do not mean to say only external, internal sweetness in her and lo, hearing it, Pushpa is smiling and smiling. Perhaps Nissim too is smiling, saying and smiling. He is chuckling from his within.

Pushpa is from a very high family as we know it. Her father is an advocate which he fails to remember it now. But he knows it not exactly, seems to have forgotten.

Pushpa has never known to say no. She accepts it all whatever say you to do she will do it without minding it. Nissim knows it how to make one climb up the tree. One can feel it in the praise he is doing.

It is neither a birthday party nor a farewell party, but a goodbye party slotted for Miss Pushpa, a Gujaratgi girl leaving for foreign, but for what purpose we know it not, as can’t say all about the hushed matter of Nissim. Nisiim is a very cunning and crafty fellow as suppresses he the love story of his life. Who is this Pushpa says he not, keeps us in the dark, saying this or that. Who she is? How has he come to know? Where is she now? A sister or just an acquaintance of his relative? Who will say it on Nissim’s behalf searching his dead letters?

Miss Pushpa is but the ironical Lucy Gray of Nissim Ezekiel whose identity know we not, can never reveal it to. As ask we out of curiosity, who Lucy was so is the case with, who Miss Pushpa T.S. is ?

Lastly, the speaker asks other members to say something, but what do they know more of Pushpa? Nissim actually even though may be an Indian Maharashtrian Jew is trying to express like a convent boy arranging the showy goodbye party in emulation of the British natives. Pushpa will sum up finally when everybody says it.

Nissim’s modernity lies it in saying please and thank you, see you, hi-hello, goodbye; bidding good morning, good evening, good night. He likes to say, nice to meet you, hello, how are you, love you, hi, see you. The cinema hall, the library, the theatre, the party, the park, etc. are the things of his stock.

Friends,
our dear sister
is departing for foreign
in two three days,
and
we are meeting today
to wish her bon voyage.

You are all knowing, friends,
What sweetness is in Miss Pushpa.
I don't mean only external sweetness
but internal sweetness.
Miss Pushpa is smiling and smiling
even for no reason but simply because
she is feeling.

Miss Pushpa is coming
from very high family.
Her father was renowned advocate
in Bulsar or Surat,
I am not remembering now which place.

Surat? Ah, yes,
once only I stayed in Surat
with family members
of my uncle's very old friend-
his wife was cooking nicely…
that was long time ago.

Coming back to Miss Pushpa
she is most popular lady
with men also and ladies also.

Whenever I asked her to do anything,
she was saying, 'Just now only
I will do it.' That is showing
good spirit. I am always
appreciating the good spirit.

Pushpa Miss is never saying no.
Whatever I or anybody is asking
she is always saying yes,
and today she is going
to improve her prospect
and we are wishing her bon voyage.
Now I ask other speakers to speak
and afterwards Miss Pushpa
will do summing up.

People say it that Nissim herein is mocking at the use of English which the Indian use and apply in speaking. It is but a Gujarati girl’s Gujarati English he is mocking which but the convent boys and girls do it everywhere in India. Nissim’s fun and cleverness everyone knows it, can understand it how he befools, outwits others. To keep the readers in doubt and suspense is the job of the poet.

The poem though written in praise of Pushpa and the goodbye party given to her is but a deviation from the central theme and hinges towards faulty English, our weak sentence construction, unknown use of words and poor word-stock. Nissim, you accept it or not, keeps the comments secret.


Nissim though writes with clarity is but a simple English using writer. His English too is one like that of his geopgraphy department professor friend’s and Pushpa’s though she has listened to it all, has not said anything else in response and instead of it, Nissim is caricaturing her, showing his convent-school learnt English, a boy in ironed shorts and shirt and polished boots and necktie going to school and returning back with the sweet words of courtesy, manner and etiquette.

5 comments:

  1. I love David Copperfield. It’s an amazing novel and Nissim Ezekiel is one of my absolute favorites. His take on social issues is really good. He is such a humorous poet. I once attended a poetry event in an event space Chicago venues has and I recited “The night of the scorpion”.

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  2. The analysis itself is an example of an InDian's use of English. Its my request to the writer of the analysis please correct the sentence formation in the analysis and also some spelling mistakes are there. Please correct them, the analysis is good

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  3. Goodbye For Miss Pushpa T.S. is one of those modern poems of Nissim Ezekiel which have not only won the acclaim and admiration of the readers as for the use of Indian pidgin-English, but for mockery, comic, fun, pun, humour and caricature he inculcates and induces in to entertain and regale us with his good sense of joviality and healthy poetic spirit as well. Choosing Miss Pushpa, a Gujarati girl as the protagonist of his poem, he says it all what he has in his heart, counselling, bidding goodbye and seeing her off. Apart from meeting her, wishing a good journey, there is nothing too much in the poem under our purview. Just as an announcer keeps announcing, the anchorman anchoring, the clown giving tips in clownery, so the case with the writer of the poem. Pushpa a girl from Surat or somewhere else nearer to it will go to foreign. Whatever one says it to her, she hears it simply rather than putting it in the full nuances and idiosyncrasies of the language. English patterned with coming and going, yes and no answers, does the things. The poem presents the writer as an entertainer, a cheerleader cheering to core, a mocker mocking, a fun-maker making a fun of. The fact too is this, if the writer has returned from England, Miss Pushpa is now about to take off to for her future prospects. A glaring example of Indian pidgin-English and the Gujarati variety of it, the piece tells a lot about our manner, use and application of spoken English.

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  4. The first stanza of the poem contains in an announcement with regard to the foreign trip, tour and travel of Miss Pushpa who is about to leave for in two to three days’ time and by the way the poet too is meeting her to wish her a nice journey. Just like the birthday celebration or bash, he is announcing and introducing which but the convent boys and girls often do it so often or are in the practice of celebrating it. Addressing the friends in a jocular tone of his, the poet tells it about.
    But in the second he himself asks it what sweetness lies is in her and himself adds to that there is some special sweetness in knowing Pushpa and it is not external, but internal sweetness which but she smiles to hear it for no reason, but taking it to and feeling it then and such a statement everybody will smile to hear it. Is it the tactics of Nissim to please? Is he trying to please her? Or, is he trying to how modern and smart is he? How much full of etiquette and good manners not, but humour and love-making? It would have better, had Miss Pushpa too said something. We want to hear from Pushpa too, but he keeps taking the microphone from her, the dais from her.

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  5. But in the second he himself asks it what sweetness lies is in her and himself adds to that there is some special sweetness in knowing Pushpa and it is not external, but internal sweetness which but she smiles to hear it for no reason, but taking it to and feeling it then and such a statement everybody will smile to hear it. Is it the tactics of Nissim to please? Is he trying to please her? Or, is he trying to how modern and smart is he? How much full of etiquette and good manners not, but humour and love-making? It would have been better, had Miss Pushpa too said something. We want to hear from Pushpa too, but he keeps taking the microphone from her, the dais from her.
    In the third the poet taking the conversation, the introduction far says it that as far as it is known to us Pushpa comes from a high family. Her father is an advocate in Surat or Bulsar which he fails to make it out or does not remember it now. But we he readers ask how he is over-colouring, exaggerating the matter, what the purpose of the poet.
    Again it flashes upon, images and memories conjure up, tumbling down to naturally. Her father is an old friend of his uncle with whom he has stayed too. Pushpa’s mother too cooks it sweetly. Once he had been to their house.
    Now to return to Miss Pushpa is to say that she is popular among men and ladies as well. Whenever he too asks her to do it something, she says it instantly that she is going to do it just now. It is not that he says it all, whoever asks her to do it anything, she will not say it no to anybody. She is humble and sweet, so gentle and noble. The good spirit which he has found in Pushpa he will keep it appreciating always.
    Pushpa is sweet that she can never say in the negative, turning down one’s requests. If this be as such, how to say it otherwise? Now the same fellow, persona is going to foreign for her better prospects. Let us wish a good journey. This is what he has he has said it. Now there are some other speakers to comment upon and lastly she will sum up herself, Miss Pushpa. The poet has presented, introduced and anchored in such a way as if he were the announcer of an orchestra. His style of recreating just now is excellent. But we know it how much time this just now takes to.
    Nissim Ezekiel just wants to say it how we struggle to speak in English, how the Indians use it trying to be conversant with the language which is not our mother tongue, but an alien acquired language, a library-consulting one. As we speak our mother tongue so the case with. Through this poem, the poet cites the Indian examples and varieties of English, as for instance, written English, grammatical English, Gujarati English, Bihari English, Bengali English, Tamil English, Malayali English, Telugu English, Kannada English, Marathi English, Konkani English, Jharkhandi English, Bhojpurian English and English used in the North East of India. But the poet’s English too is an example of conventy English, which but the boys and girls of English convent schools use in and he too prides over that he is a convent school product for to be a poet. But Pushpa’s is an advocate’s English taking it to the start of things in India by a foreign learner trying to be conversant with, fluent in.
    Nissim Ezekiel sometimes overacts and this poem is an example of that as because he has dragged the poem, making it hurtles across just with the present continuous tenses and Goodbye Party For Miss Pushpa T.S. is just a poem of coming and going, going and coming.

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